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Richard Abernethy

September 8, 2009 Length: 599 words 0 comments

Save Vestas Campaign

For eighteen days, from July 20 to August 7, a group of workers at the Vestas wind turbine factory at Newport, on the Isle of Wight, on the south coast of England, held a sit-in at the plant. The occupation was part of a continuing campaign to prevent the closure of the plant by the Danish-owned company, Vestas Wind Systems, and the loss of about 625 jobs.

The group left the premises, to the cheers of hundreds of supporters, just before bailiffs were due to enforce a court order to remove them. A picket of the factory continues at the time of writing, and a national day of solidarity activities has been called for Sept. 17.

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Peter Hudis

September 8, 2009 Length: 12778 words 0 comments

Towards an Organizational History of the Philosophy of Marxist-Humanism in the U.S.

Of all the problems and contradictions that have afflicted the radical movement since the time of Marx, those pertaining to the dialectics of organization has proven to be the most difficult and perplexing of them all. Leftist groups and radical tendencies of various sorts have come and gone over the years, but the effort to develop revolutionary organizations on the basis of the insights of dialectical philosophy remains a task to be done.

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Karen Kubby

September 8, 2009 Length: 678 words 0 comments

Success of Reform Hinges on Women’s Health Care

Radical change is never accepted easily. With the current discussion on health care reform, we have an opportunity to dismantle three basic dysfunctional tenets of the current system.

The first tenet is that access to health care is a privilege and not a basic human need that our society as a whole values for everyone. Second, for most people, access to health care services is dependent on a person’s employment status. And third, insurance companies and employers are in control of the kinds of health care to which we have access.

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Cyrus Bina

September 2, 2009 Length: 859 words 0 comments

An Open Letter to Obama

Racism, Class and Profiling

Author’s note: The arrest of Harvard Professor Henry Louis Gates speaks to the question of race and class in America. In terms of the media and pundit response, it also speaks to the absurdity of personalization and thus the substitution, in this case, of Gates’s socioeconomic status for the social question of “race” in the United States.

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Dale Parsons

September 1, 2009 Length: 4336 words 0 comments

Hearing the Voice of Labor on the Economic Crisis

There are “two worlds” in each country, the “rulers” and the “ruled” or to put it more concretely, between workers and non-workers. Never, in my lifetime, has the divide between workers and non-workers in the U.S. been as vast as it is during the current economic crisis. The working class is bearing the brunt of the crisis, yet how much of their actual voice are we hearing in the political debate about the economy?

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September 1, 2009 Length: 111 words 0 comments

Iranian Progressives in Translation

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Kamran Afary,
Kevin B. Anderson

August 31, 2009 Length: 3185 words 0 comments

Behind the 2009 Upheaval in Iran

The upheaval in Iran has shaken up Iranian and even regional politics. Not since the Palestinian Intifada of 1987 has the Middle East seen such a massive and persistent grassroots mobilization. At the same time, the Iranian upheaval is also the product of deep divisions inside the nation’s dominant classes.

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Hassan Mortazavi

August 6, 2009 Length: 2776 words 0 comments

New Persian Translation of Marx’s Capital (Translator’s Preface)

A year after its publication, the new Persian translation of Marx’s Capital has sold out in Iran and is undergoing a reprint. Translator Hassan Mortazavi explains why he felt compelled to translate Capital anew, years after the publication of Iraj Eskandari’s translation in 1973.

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Paresh Chattopadhyay

August 5, 2009 Length: 3738 words 0 comments

Remembering the Tiananmen Democrats (1989-2009)*

This year marks the twentieth anniversary of the great movement of the Chinese students centred on Beijing’s Tiananmen square and the bloody suppression of this non-violent, democratic movement by the Chinese state power.

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Kevin B. Anderson

July 17, 2009 Length: 956 words 0 comments

French Union Evicts Africans

The French CGT union’s racist expulsion of African immigrants from its offices reveals deep contradictions inside the labor movement.

On Wednesday, June 24, a terrible event took place in Paris: Hundreds of Africans sans papiers (undocumented immigrants) who had occupied the Bourse de Travail for over a year were evicted and pushed onto the street with their belongings. These workers had taken refuge in the Bourse du Travail, a union-run employment service, because they have no work permits and hope to secure legalization.

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June 23, 2009 Length: 1260 words 0 comments

In Iran, Voices of Revolt of Students and Workers

’This place is a thousand times worse than Guantanamo’

Excerpts from a report on the torture of students arrested At Tehran University from Akhbar Rooz

Translator’s note: During the early morning hours of June 15, 2009, The dormitory of Tehran University was attacked by Iranian security forces and plainclothes policemen. Five students were killed and many were arrested. Below is a report which describes the ordeal of the arrested students.

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June 16, 2009 Length: 2097 words 0 comments

Preliminary Statement on the Upheaval in Iran

The blatant theft of the June elections has touched off the biggest crisis for the Islamic Republic of Iran in over two decades. Large sectors of the Iranian people have come into the streets to protest, especially youth, women, and intellectuals. Already, the population is beginning to lose its fear, at least in major cities like Isfahan, Tabriz, and Shiraz, and especially Tehran, where protestors have repeatedly confronted the fundamentalist Basiji militia, in some cases driving them off the streets.

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June 3, 2009 Length: 738 words 0 comments

On the Earthquake, Humanism, and Marxism

The Sichuan earthquake is very terrible; it killed so many people within a brief second, especially many students of middle schools and primary schools, and even some kindergartens. You can imagine how deeply many families are damaged under the policy of population control. The number of victims is increasing every day. The official figure is about 50,000, but most of people in China do not think so.

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Heather Tomanovsky

June 3, 2009 Length: 2255 words 0 comments

Gender, the Family and ‘The German Ideology’

The German Ideology (1845), often seen as the most materialistic of Marx’s early writings, has been taken up mostly by structuralist and orthodox Marxists, but this work is especially important in terms of understanding Marx’s views on gender and the family to Marxist-Humanists as well.

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Peter Hudis

June 1, 2009 Length: 1847 words 0 comments

Rethinking the Crisis of Capital in Light of the Crisis of the Left

“Far from expressing a sequence of never-ending progression, the Hegelian dialectic lets retrogression appear as translucent as progression and indeed makes it very nearly inevitable if one ever tries to escape regression by mere faith.”—Raya Dunayevskaya (1)

It may seem ironic that a moment so typified by the crisis of capital calls for a serious critique of the crisis on the Left; however, in the present moment it has become impossible to take on the crisis of existing society without facing the limitations found in prevailing leftist responses to it.

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